Mount Shasta Pika Project

Mount Shasta Pika Project





Ochotona on Mount Shasta,  California
Appendix


Ochotona in Wikipedia
Ochotona princeps in Wikipedia
The Persistence of Pikas. Beever. 2002.
Patterns of Extirpation. Beever, et al 2003.
Decreasing Census in American Pika. 2004.
Distribution and Climatic Relationships in American Pika,
Millar and Westfall. 2010.
Testing Alternative Models of Climate-mediated Extirpations. Beever, et al 2010
Is The American Pika Really On The Road To Extinction Due to Climate Change?
Kurt Repanshek, 2010
 U.S. Declines to List the American Pika as Endangered, Federal Register, 2010
Revisiting the past to foretell the future: summer temperature and habitat area predict pika extirpations in California. Journal of Biogeography (2015)
Joseph A. E. Stewart, John D. Perrine, Lyle B. Nichols, James H. Thorne, Constance I. Millar, Kenneth E. Goehring, Cody P. Massing and David H. Wright *
Pika (Ochotona princeps) losses from two isolated regions reflect temperature and water balance, but reflect habitat area in a mainland region. Journal of Mammology (2016)
Erik A. Beever, John D. Perrine, Tom Rickman, Mary Flores, John P. Clark, Cassie Waters, Shana S. Weber, Braden Yardley, David Thoma, Tara Chesley-Preston, Kenneth E. Goehring, Michael Magnuson, Nancy Nordensten, Melissa Nelson, Gail H. Collins *
Distribution, climatic relationships, and status of American pikas (Ochotona princeps) in the Great Basin, USA. Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research (2018)
Constance I. Millar, Diane L. Delany, Kimberly A. Hersey, Mackenzie R. Jeffress, Andrew T. Smith, K. Jane Van Gunst & Robert D. Westfall
Alternatives to genetic affinity as a context for within-species response to climate. Nature: Climate Change. (2019)
Adam Smith, Erik Beever, Aimee Kessler, Aaron Johnston, Chris Ray, et al. (the full list of authors can be found on the journal page) *
Note: * = Used data from this study


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